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BMJ. 1998 Sep 5;317(7159):632-7.

Are amoxycillin and folate inhibitors as effective as other antibiotics for acute sinusitis? A meta-analysis.

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  • 1Division of Clinical Care Research, Department of Medicine, New England Medical Center, 750 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02111, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine whether antibiotics are indicated in treating uncomplicated acute sinusitis and, if so, whether newer and more expensive antibiotics with broad spectra of antimicrobial activity are more effective than amoxycillin or folate inhibitors.

DESIGN:

Meta-analysis of randomised trials.

SETTING:

Outpatient clinics.

SUBJECTS:

2717 patients with acute sinusitis or acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis from 27 trials.

INTERVENTIONS:

Any antibiotic versus placebo; amoxycillin or folate inhibitors versus newer, more expensive antibiotics.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:

Clinical failures and cures.

RESULTS:

Compared with placebo, antibiotics decreased the incidence of clinical failures by half (risk ratio 0.54 (95% confidence interval 0.37 to 0.79)). Risk of clinical failure among 1553 randomised patients was not meaningfully decreased with more expensive antibiotics as compared with amoxycillin (risk ratio 0.86 (0.62 to 1.19); risk difference 0.9 fewer failures per 100 patients (1.4 more failures to 3.1 fewer failures per 100 patients)). The results were similar for other antibiotics versus folate inhibitors (risk ratio 1.01 (0.52 to 1.97)), but data were sparse (n=410) and of low quality.

CONCLUSIONS:

Amoxycillin and folate inhibitors are essentially as effective as more expensive antibiotics for the initial treatment of uncomplicated acute sinusitis. Small differences in efficacy may exist, but are unlikely to be clinically important.

PMID:
9727991
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC28657
Free PMC Article
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