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Circulation. 1998 Aug 25;98(8):731-3.

Prospective study of C-reactive protein and the risk of future cardiovascular events among apparently healthy women.

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  • 1Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass, USA. pmridker@bics.bwh.harvard.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

C-reactive protein (CRP) predicts risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke among apparently healthy men, but in women, virtually no data are available.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

CRP was measured in baseline blood samples from 122 apparently healthy participants in the Women's Health Study who subsequently suffered a first cardiovascular event and from 244 age- and smoking-matched control subjects who remained free of cardiovascular disease during a 3-year follow-up period. Women who developed cardiovascular events had higher baseline CRP levels than control subjects (P=0.0001), such that those with the highest levels at baseline had a 5-fold increase in risk of any vascular event (RR=4.8; 95% CI, 2.3 to 10.1; P=0.0001) and a 7-fold increase in risk of MI or stroke (RR=7.3; 95% CI, 2.7 to 19.9; P=0.0001). Risk estimates were independent of other risk factors, and prediction models that included CRP provided a better method to predict risk than models that excluded CRP (all P values <0.01). In stratified analyses, CRP was a predictor among subgroups of women with low as well as high risk as defined by other cardiovascular risk factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

In these prospective data among women, CRP is a strong independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease that adds to the predictive value of risk models based on usual factors alone. (Circulation. 1998;98:731-733.)

Comment in

  • ACP J Club. 1999 Jan-Feb;130(1):22.
PMID:
9727541
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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