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Arch Dermatol. 1998 Jul;134(7):799-804.

Long-term effectiveness and safety of recombinant human interferon gamma therapy for atopic dermatitis despite unchanged serum IgE levels.

Author information

  • 1Department of Dermatology, Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Ohio 44106-5028, USA. srs@po.cwru.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the long-term effects of recombinant human interferon gamma treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD).

DESIGN:

Case series. Patients were treated for up to 24 months.

SETTING:

University dermatology outpatient clinics in Ann Arbor, Mich, and Portland, Ore.

PATIENTS:

Twenty-four of 32 eligible patients who participated in a previously reported, 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of recombinant human interferon gamma treatment for AD were enrolled.

INTERVENTION:

Patients self-administered recombinant human interferon gamma, 50 microg/m2, by daily subcutaneous injection.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Overall response; body surface area of involvement; clinical severity scores for pruritus, erythema, edema, excoriations, dryness, scaling, and lichenification; other atopic symptoms; and laboratory parameters, including serum IgE levels, were monitored at quarterly visits. Results at 1 and 2 years were compared with baseline values.

RESULTS:

All efficacy parameters improved (P<.05). For example, pruritus was reduced by 50% after both 1 (n=24, P<.001) and 2 (n=16, P=.005) years. Allergic conjunctivitis and allergic rhinitis also improved (P<.01). Eosinophil counts decreased significantly (P<.001). IgE levels increased. Clinical improvement more closely correlated with changes in eosinophil counts (r=0.3-0.5) than with changes in IgE levels (r=0.0-0.2). Only 1 patient discontinued therapy because of adverse effects (flulike symptoms).

CONCLUSIONS:

The initial efficacy and adverse effects reported for recombinant human interferon gamma treatment of patients with AD were maintained after 2 years of long-term use. Recombinant human interferon gamma seems to be a well-tolerated and effective agent in the long-term therapy of patients with AD. Therapies that correct cellular immune defects, but not humoral immune defects, may be effective in the treatment of patients with AD.

Comment in

PMID:
9681342
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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