Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Urban Health. 1998 Mar;75(1):123-34.

Effectiveness of pediatric practice consultation on missed opportunities for immunization.

Author information

  • 1Department of Maternal and Child Health, Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. nhughart@jhsph.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effectiveness of pediatric practice consultation in reducing missed-opportunity rates at eight pediatric sites in Baltimore, Maryland. The overarching goal was to decrease the occurrence of missed opportunities from 33% to 15% for the first, second, and third diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccines during visits at which children were eligible for the vaccines.

DESIGN:

The effect of an in-office educational program alone at four sites is compared with the educational program and a consultation on office vaccination practices at four matched sites. All eight sites received a small grant ($2,000) to fund practice changes. The medical records of children making visits before and after the interventions were audited to determine missed-opportunity rates. The policies and operations and the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of physicians and nurse practitioners at each site were also assessed.

RESULTS:

The four education-consultation sites experienced a statistically significant 14% net reduction in the missed-opportunity rate relative to the education-only sites. This positive effect, however, was largely due to an increase in missed opportunities at one education-only site. There was a 10% increase in the missed-opportunity rate among the education-only sites and a 4% decrease among the education-consultation sites; neither change was statistically significant. Two of the three sites that reduced missed opportunities were matched health maintenance organizations (HMOs). Shortly after the interventions, both HMOs implemented tracking and follow-up information systems, which were planned before the interventions.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is no evidence that either the educational program alone or the educational program and consultation combination reduced missed opportunities. The findings suggest that improved tracking and follow-up data systems and vaccination of children at sick visits may reduce missed opportunities.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk