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J Hypertens. 1998 Jun;16(6):771-8.

The effect of home training with direct blood pressure biofeedback of hypertensives: a placebo-controlled study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Cardiology and The Cooperative Research Centre for Cardiac Technology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Home training in self-lowering of blood pressure using continuous blood pressure feedback has not previously been reported. Enhancement of laboratory-learned skills was hypothesized on the basis of outcomes from other intellectual, emotional and physical endeavours.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the supplementary effect of home blood pressure biofeedback training.

DESIGN:

Thirty unmedicated, mild hypertensives participated in a randomized, double-blinded, modified contingency placebo-controlled study.

METHOD:

After suitable screening and baseline blood pressure measurements subjects undertook eight laboratory biofeedback sessions and then 12 home training sessions over 4 weeks using continuous finger blood pressure monitoring.

RESULTS:

In the laboratory those being administered active therapy (n=16) lowered systolic pressures by 5 +/- 5.4 mmHg compared with a lowering of 4 +/- 4.2 mmHg with placebo (NS). During the fourth week at home lowering for the active group (11 +/- 8 mmHg) was greater than that with placebo (4 +/- 6.2 mmHg, P=0.017). Arm-cuff blood pressures were not statistically different for groups and with time but that of the active group was lower by 9 +/- 15.4/7 +/- 10.2 mmHg, which is a clinically relevant change, after home biofeedback.

CONCLUSIONS:

The efficacy of self-lowering of systolic blood pressure in mild hypertensives by continuous feedback was enhanced by 6 mmHg with 4 weeks of practice at home. Standard arm-cuff blood pressure was reduced by a clinically relevant amount. The home environment proved cost effective for this 'high-tech' approach.

PMID:
9663917
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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