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Can J Public Health. 1998 May-Jun;89(3):152-6.

The effect of the urban ambient air pollution mix on daily mortality rates in 11 Canadian cities.

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  • 1Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON. rickvburnett@hc-sc.gc.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Determine the risk of premature mortality due to the urban ambient air pollution mix in Canada.

METHODS:

The number of daily deaths for non-accidental causes were obtained in 11 cities from 1980 to 1991 and linked to concentrations of ambient gaseous air pollutants using relative risk regression models for longitudinal count data.

RESULTS:

Nitrogen dioxide had the largest effect on mortality with a 4.1% increased risk (p < 0.01), followed by ozone at 1.8% (p < 0.01), sulphur dioxide at 1.4% (p < 0.01), and carbon monoxide at 0.9% (p = 0.04) in multiple pollutant regression models. A 0.4% reduction in premature mortality was attributed to achieving a sulphur content of gasoline of 30 ppm in five Canadian cities, a risk reduction 12 times greater than previously reported.

CONCLUSIONS:

Ambient air pollution generated from the burning of fossil fuels is a risk factor for premature mortality in 11 Canadian cities.

PIP:

The authors investigate "the risk of premature mortality due to the urban ambient air pollution mix in Canada.... Nitrogen dioxide had the largest effect on mortality with a 4.1% increased risk (p0.01), followed by ozone at 1.8% (p0.01), sulphur dioxide at 1.4% (p0.01), and carbon monoxide at 0.9% (p=0.04) in multiple pollutant regression models. A 0.4% reduction in premature mortality was attributed to achieving a sulphur content of gasoline of 30 ppm in five Canadian cities, a risk reduction 12 times greater than previously reported." (EXCERPT)

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PMID:
9654797
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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