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Mol Cell Biol. 1998 Jul;18(7):4291-300.

Human cyclin K, a novel RNA polymerase II-associated cyclin possessing both carboxy-terminal domain kinase and Cdk-activating kinase activity.

Author information

  • 1Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Abstract

The gene coding for human cyclin K was isolated as a CPR (cell-cycle progression restoration) gene by virtue of its ability to impart a Far- phenotype to the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to rescue the lethality of a deletion of the G1 cyclin genes CLN1, CLN2, and CLN3. The cyclin K gene encodes a 357-amino-acid protein most closely related to human cyclins C and H, which have been proposed to play a role in regulating basal transcription through their association with and activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) that phosphorylate the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). Murine and Drosophila melanogaster homologs of cyclin K have also been identified. Cyclin K mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in adult mouse and human tissues, but is most abundant in the developing germ cells of the adult testis and ovaries. Cyclin K is associated with potent CTD kinase and Cdk kinase (CAK) activity in vitro and coimmunoprecipitates with the large subunit of RNAP II. Thus, cyclin K represents a new member of the "transcription" cyclin family which may play a dual role in regulating Cdk and RNAP II activity.

PMID:
9632813
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC109013
Free PMC Article

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