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Biol Psychiatry. 1998 Jun 15;43(12):908-12.

Serotonin transporter gene variants in alcohol-dependent subjects with dissocial personality disorder.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Benjamin Franklin, W├╝rzburg, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We tested the hypothesis that a functional biallelic repetitive element in the 5' regulatory region of the human serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) confers susceptibility to serotonin-related personality traits underlying alcohol dependence with dissocial behavior.

METHODS:

The association study was focused on 64 alcohol-dependent subjects with a dissocial personality disorder (according to ICD-10) who were derived from 315 German alcohol-dependent subjects. The Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) was applied to assess personality dimensions in 101 alcohol-dependent men, including 39 dissocial alcoholics.

RESULTS:

Our association analyses revealed a trend towards a higher frequency of the short (S) allele of the SLC6A4 polymorphism in dissocial alcoholics compared to 216 German controls (chi 2 = 2.81, df = 1, p = 0.094). Dissocial alcoholics carrying the S/S genotype exhibited significant lower scores of harm avoidance compared to those lacking it (U-test, p = 0.015). Significantly higher novelty seeking scores were obtained in dissocial alcoholics carrying the S allele relative to those lacking it (U-test, p = 0.021).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our tentative association findings in dissocial alcoholics suggest that the S allele of the 5' regulatory SLC6A4 polymorphism confers susceptibility to a temperamental profile of high novelty seeking and low harm avoidance that has been postulated to underlie dissocial (type-2) alcoholism according to Cloninger's neurogenetic theory of personality.

PMID:
9627746
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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