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Am J Ophthalmol. 1998 May;125(5):635-46.

Translocation of the retina for management of subfoveal choroidal neovascularization II: a preliminary report in humans.

Author information

  • 1The Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA. edejuan@gwgate1.jhmi.jhu.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To report a surgical method for translocation of the foveal retina in eyes with subfoveal choroidal neovascularization.

METHODS:

In three eyes of three patients, a crescent-shaped, partial-thickness scleral resection was performed near the equator at either the superotemporal or the inferotemporal quadrant. A near-total retinal detachment was created; then the edges of the resected sclera were sutured, causing shortening of the sclera with subsequent reattachment of the retina, resulting in translocation of the fovea to an area overlying nonfoveal retinal pigment epithelium and choroid.

RESULTS:

In three eyes of three patients, the fovea was surgically translocated to overlie retinal pigment epithelium that preoperatively was not underlying the fovea. In two patients, laser photocoagulation was applied to the choroidal neovascularization that, after translocation of the fovea, was no longer subfoveal, so that the photocoagulation was not associated with immediate visual loss. After a follow-up of 4 to 6 months, the visual acuity had improved in all patients (from 20/126 preoperatively to 20/70 in one patient, from 20/200 preoperatively to 20/70 in the second, and from 20/160 to 20/30 in the third). The patients noted distortion or tilting of the images, which improved over time.

CONCLUSIONS:

Limited foveal translocation may offer a therapeutic modality to preserve or improve vision in cases of subfoveal choroidal neovascularization. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the impact of potential complications associated with the surgical procedure, such as retinal detachment, proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and cataract, as well as the possibility of recurrent choroidal neovascularization.

Comment in

  • Macular translocation. [Am J Ophthalmol. 1998]
PMID:
9625547
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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