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Hypertension. 1998 Jun;31(6):1235-9.

Racial differences in nitric oxide-mediated vasodilator response to mental stress in the forearm circulation.

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  • 1Cardiology Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-1650, USA.

Abstract

An abnormal hemodynamic response to stressful stimuli has been proposed as a mechanism involved in the higher prevalence of hypertension in blacks. Given the important role of nitric oxide (NO) in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis, we investigated the possibility of racial differences in vascular NO activity during mental stress. To test this hypothesis, we compared the forearm blood flow (FBF) response to mental stress in 14 white and 12 black healthy subjects during intra-arterial infusion of either saline or NO synthesis inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 4 micromol/min). We also examined vascular responses of the two groups to intra-arterial infusion of sodium nitroprusside (0.8 to 3.2 microg/min), an exogenous NO donor. During saline infusion, the increase in FBF from baseline induced by mental stress was significantly higher in whites than in blacks (109+/-20% versus 58+/-8%; P=0.03). L-NMMA significantly reduced stress-induced increase in FBF in whites (from 109+/-20% to 54+/-11%; P=0.004) but not in blacks (from 58+/-8% to 42+/-10%; P=0.24); thus, the vasodilator effect of stress testing during L-NMMA was similar in whites and blacks (54+/-11% versus 42+/-10%; P=0.44). The vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside was also lower in blacks than in whites (maximum flow, 6.9+/-2 versus 11.6+/-3.5 mL x min(-1) x dL(-1); P=0.001) and was not significantly modified by L-NMMA in either group. Our findings indicate that blacks have a reduced NO-dependent vasodilator activity during mental stress. This difference seems related to reduced sensitivity of smooth muscle to the vasodilator effect of NO and may play some role in the increased prevalence of hypertension and its complications in blacks.

PMID:
9622135
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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