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Circulation. 1998 May 19;97(19):1907-11.

Left ventricular geometry and severe left ventricular hypertrophy in children and adolescents with essential hypertension.

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  • 1Division of Cardiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Children's Hospital Medical Center, Ohio 45229, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy has been established as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in adults. Recent research has refined this relationship by determining a cutpoint of 51 g/m(2.7) for LV mass index indicative of increased risk and defining LV geometric patterns that are associated with increased risk. The purpose of this study was to evaluate severe LV hypertrophy and LV geometry in children and adolescents with essential hypertension.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

A cross-sectional study of young patients (n=130) with persistent blood pressure elevation above the 90th percentile was conducted. Nineteen patients (14%) had LV mass greater than the 99th percentile; 11 of these were also above the adult cutpoint of 51 g/m(2.7). Males, subjects with greater body mass index, and those who had lower heart rate at maximum exercise were at significantly (P<.05) higher risk of severe LV hypertrophy. In addition, 22 patients (17%) had concentric LV hypertrophy, a geometric pattern that is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adults. Seven patients had LV mass index above the cutpoint and concentric hypertrophy. No consistent significant determinants of LV geometry were identified in these children and adolescents with hypertension.

CONCLUSIONS:

Severe LV hypertrophy and abnormal LV geometry are relatively prevalent in young patients with essential hypertension. These findings suggest that these patients may be at risk for future cardiovascular disease and underscore the importance of recognition and treatment of blood pressure elevation in children and adolescents. Weight loss is an important component of therapy in young patients with essential hypertension who are overweight.

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PMID:
9609083
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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