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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1998 May 8;246(1):293-8.

The effects of iron and vitamin C co-supplementation on oxidative damage to DNA in healthy volunteers.

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  • 1International Antioxidant Research Centre, Department of Pharmacology, King's College, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

The effects of co-supplementing healthy volunteers with iron (14 mg/day ferrous sulphate) and vitamin C (either 60 mg/day or 260 mg/day as ascorbic acid) on levels of oxidative DNA damage in white blood cells were studied. The subjects were divided into two groups: one group of 20 volunteers with a higher mean initial level of plasma vitamin C (71.9 +/- 14.0 mumol/l) and a second group of 18 volunteers with a lower mean level (50.4 +/- 25.8 mumol/l). In the first group there was a significant rise in several oxidative DNA base damage products and in total oxidative DNA damage in DNA extracted from white blood cells, but not in 8-hydroxyguanine, after 6 weeks of supplementation. However, after 12 weeks levels returned approximately to normal. In the group with the lower initial level of plasma ascorbate, presupplemental levels of oxidative DNA damage were higher and decreased on supplementation with iron and ascorbate. Since oxidative DNA damage has been suggested as a risk factor for the development of cancer, the implications of increased levels in well-nourished subjects after iron/ascorbate supplementation are disturbing in view of the frequent use of dietary supplements containing both iron salts and ascorbate.

PMID:
9600109
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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