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Eur J Clin Nutr. 1998 Apr;52(4):300-7.

Exercise in dietary restrained women: no effect on energy intake but change in hedonic ratings.

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  • 1BioPsychology Group, School of Psychology, University of Leeds, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the short-term effects (one day) of exercise and diet composition on appetite control in restrained females.

DESIGN:

2x2 repeated measures design, with exercise and lunch type used as the repeated factors.

SETTING:

The Human Appetite Research Unit at Leeds University Psychology Department.

SUBJECTS:

Twelve dietary restrained females, normal weight and regular exercisers

INTERVENTIONS:

A control (rest) and a bout of high intensity exercise (cycling 50 min., 70% VO2 max.) was followed by a free-selection lunch comprising high-fat (HF) or low-fat (LF) foods. Hunger and heart rate profiles were tracked. Energy Intake (EI) was monitored in the laboratory throughout the day. Post-meal hedonic ratings were completed after lunch and dinner.

RESULTS:

There was a significant effect of lunch type (HF vs LF) on EI following exercise and rest (P < 0.001) and on total 24 h EI (P < 0.05): EI increased during both HF conditions compared to the LF. A main effect of exercise on tastiness and pleasantness (P < 0.05) of the LF foods served at lunch was found. However, there was no effect of exercise on hunger, weight or energy value of food eaten.

CONCLUSIONS:

Exercise raises the perceived pleasantness of foods in dietary restrained women, but does not increase the drive to eat within 8 h of the cessation of exercise. The combination of physical activity and a low-fat diet could be used advantageously to control appetite, prevent overconsumption and protect against the development of obesity.

PMID:
9578343
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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