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Am J Public Health. 1998 Apr;88(4):663-6.

Differences in preconceptional and prenatal behaviors in women with intended and unintended pregnancies.

Author information

  • 1Division of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55454-1015, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study examined whether pregnancy intention was associated with cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, use of vitamins, and consumption of caffeinated drinks prior to pregnancy and in early pregnancy.

METHODS:

Data from a telephone survey of 7174 pregnant women were analyzed.

RESULTS:

In comparison with women whose pregnancies were intended, women with unintended pregnancies were more likely to report cigarette smoking and less likely to report daily vitamin use. Women with unintended pregnancies were also less likely to decrease consumption of caffeinated beverages or increase daily vitamin use.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pregnancy intention was associated with health behaviors, prior to pregnancy and in early pregnancy, that may influence pregnancy course and birth outcomes.

PMID:
9551015
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1508432
Free PMC Article
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