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Hum Mol Genet. 1998 May;7(5):865-70.

Identification of a mutation in liver glycogen phosphorylase in glycogen storage disease type VI.

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  • 1Laboratory of Genetic Disease Research and Medical Genetics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Abstract

Glycogen storage disease type VI (GSD6) defines a group of disorders that cause hepatomegaly and hypoglycemia with reduced liver phosphorylase activity. The course of these disorders is generally mild, but definitive diagnosis requires invasive procedures. We analyzed a Mennonite kindred with an autosomal recessive form of GSD6 to determine the molecular defect and develop a non-invasive diagnostic test. Linkage analysis was performed using genetic markers flanking the liver glycogen phosphorylase gene ( PYGL ), which was suspected to be the cause of the disorder on biochemical grounds. Mennonite GSD6 was linked to the PYGL locus with a multipoint LOD score of 4.7. The PYGL gene was analyzed for mutations by sequencing genomic DNA. Sequencing of genomic DNA revealed a splice site abnormality of the intron 13 splice donor. Confirmation of the genomic mutation was performed by sequencing RT-PCR products, which showed heterogeneous PYGL mRNA lacking all or part of exon 13 in affected persons. This study is the first to demonstrate that a mutation in the PYGL gene can cause GSD6. This mutation is estimated to be present on 3% of Mennonite chromosomes and the disease affects 0.1% of that population. Determination of this mutation provides a basis for the development of a simple and non-invasive diagnostic test for the disease and the carrier state in this population and confirms biochemical data showing the importance of this gene in glucose homeostasis.

PMID:
9536091
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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