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Hypertension. 1998 Apr;31(4):1014-20.

Hypertension optimal treatment (HOT) study: home blood pressure in treated hypertensive subjects.

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  • 1Division of Cardiology, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. sverrekj@ulrik.uio.no

Abstract

The Hypertension Optimal Treatment Study is a prospective trial conducted in 26 countries. The aims are to (1) evaluate the relationship between three levels of target office diastolic blood pressure (BP) (< or = 80, < or = 85, or < or = 90 mm Hg) and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hypertensive patients and (2) examine the effects on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of 75 mg aspirin daily versus placebo. A total of 19,193 patients between 50 and 80 years of age had been randomized by the end of April 1994. Treatment was initiated with felodipine 5 mg daily, and additional therapy was given in accordance with a set protocol. The present substudy of 926 patients performed in nine countries aimed to (1) compare home with office BP in a representative subsample of the HOT population after the titration of treatment was completed and (2) clarify whether the separation into the target groups could be expanded into the out-of-office setting. The differences between office and home measurements in diastolic BP of 0.2 mm Hg (SD, 9; 95% confidence interval, -0.36 to 0.81; P=.40) and systolic BP of 0.5 mm Hg (SD, 15; 95% confidence interval, -0.53 to 1.46; P=.21) were not significant. The group differences in home BP were 1.9 mm Hg (< or = 80 versus < or = 85) and 1.2 mm Hg (< or = 85 versus < or = 90) for diastolic BP (F=11.69; ANOVA, P<.0001) and 2.6 and 2.1 mm Hg for systolic BP (F=8.44, P=.0002). Thus, office and home BPs measured with the same semiautomatic device are comparable in treated hypertensive subjects in the HOT Study, and the separation into the target groups based on office readings prevails at home.

PMID:
9535429
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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