Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Am J Ind Med. 1998 Apr;33(4):366-73.

Mortality of a police cohort: 1950-1990.

Author information

  • 1Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo 14214, USA. jmvgcj@ritvax.isc.vit

Abstract

This study presents findings from an updated retrospective cohort mortality study of male police officers from January 1, 1950 to December 31, 1990 (n = 2,593; 58,474 person-years; 98% follow-up). Significantly higher than expected mortality rates were found for all cause mortality (Standardized mortality ratio [SMR] = 110; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.04-1.17), all malignant neoplasms (SMR = 125; 95% CI = 1.10-1.41), cancer of the esophagus (SMR = 213; 95% CI = 1.01-3.91), cancer of the colon (SMR = 187; 95% CI = 1.29-2.59), cancer of the kidney (SMR = 2.08, 95% CI = 100-3.82), Hodgkin's disease (SMR = 313; 95% CI = 1.01-7.29), cirrhosis of the liver (SMR = 150; 95% CI = 1.00-2.16), and suicide (SMR = 153; 95% CI = 1.00-2.24). All accidents were significantly lower (SMR = 53; 95% CI = 0.34-0.79). Mortality by years of police service showed higher than expected rates for (1) all malignant neoplasms in the 1- to 9-years-of-service group; (2) all causes, bladder cancer, leukemia, and arteriosclerotic heart disease in the 10 to 19-year group; and (3) colon cancer and cirrhosis of the liver in the over 30 years of service group. Hypotheses for findings are discussed.

PMID:
9513643
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk