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J Abnorm Psychol. 1998 Feb;107(1):128-40.

Development of depression from preadolescence to young adulthood: emerging gender differences in a 10-year longitudinal study.

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  • 1Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706, USA. blhankin@students.wisc.edu

Abstract

The authors investigated the emergence of gender differences in clinical depression and the overall development of depression from preadolescence to young adulthood among members of a complete birth cohort using a prospective longitudinal approach with structured diagnostic interviews administered 5 times over the course of 10 years. Small gender differences in depression (females greater than males) first began to emerge between the ages of 13 and 15. However, the greatest increase in this gender difference occurred between ages 15 and 18. Depression rates and accompanying gender differences for a university student subsample were no different than for a nonuniversity subsample. There was no gender difference for depression recurrence or for depression symptom severity. The peak increase in both overall rates of depression and new cases of depression occurred between the ages of 15 and 18. Results suggest that middle-to-late adolescence (ages 15-18) may be a critical time for studying vulnerability to depression because of the higher depression rates and the greater risk for depression onset and dramatic increase in gender differences in depression during this period.

PMID:
9505045
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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