Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1998 Feb 13;243(2):531-7.

Triplet repeat-containing ribosomal protein L14 gene in immortalized human endothelial cell line (t-HUE4).

Author information

  • 1National Institute of Bioscience and Human-Technology, Ibaraki, Japan. tmanami@nibh.go.jp

Abstract

A cDNA encoding human 60S ribosomal subunit protein L14 (hRL14) was isolated from a human immortal endothelial cell line, t-HUE4. This cell line was established via a series of cell lines cultured in a serum-free and a protein-free medium, and a directional cDNA library has been constructed and screened in search for the genes modulating protein synthesis machinery in cell proliferation. A putative full-length clone with an open reading frame of 220 amino acids; predicted molecular weight of 23.6 kDa. A significant identity for hRL14 was observed with rat RL14 (85% identity), with exception of COOH-terminal region, but not with any eukaryote amino acid sequences so far deposited to database. The typical features of ribosomal proteins were observed in hRL14, as seen in nuclear targeting sequences necessary for the transport from cytoplasm to nucleolus, a bZIP like (basic region-leucine zipper) element for the binding to rRNA, and the internal repeat sequences; the pentapeptide QKA(A/S)X. The COOH-terminal region of the transcripts contained fifteen triplet repeats (GCT; alanine) at nucleotide 465 to 509, which is significantly expanded compared to the rat RL14. However, the repeat number was all the same among the normal human endothelial cell line and the cell lines established in the course of t-HUE4 establishment. A single band with about 800 bases was identified by Northern blot analysis without tissue specificity. This GCT repeat was found to be one of the longest uninterrupted repeats in a coding sequence, which were associated with the highest degree of polymorphism.

PMID:
9480843
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk