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Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1998 Jan;19(1):23-7.

Increased bloodstream infection rates in surgical patients associated with variation from recommended use and care following implementation of a needleless device.

Author information

  • 1Hospital Infections Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if an apparent increase in bloodstream infections (BSIs) in patients with central venous catheters (CVCs) was associated with the implementation of a needleless access device.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study using a derived CVC-days factor for estimating appropriate denominator data.

SETTING:

A 350-bed urban, acute, tertiary-care hospital.

METHODS:

BSI surveillance data were obtained, and high-risk areas for BSIs were determined. A random 5% sample of medical records was used to estimate CVC days, and a cohort study was conducted to compare BSI rates before and during needleless device use. A survey was conducted of nursing needleless-device practices.

RESULTS:

The surgical intensive-care unit (SICU), the medical intensive-care unit, and the solid organ transplant unit (OTU) were identified as high-risk units. Using existing surveillance BSI data and the estimated CVC days, the catheter-related BSI rates in the high-risk surgical patients were significantly higher during the needleless-device period compared with the preneedleless-device period (SICU, 9.4 vs 5.0/1,000 CVC days; OTU, 13.6 vs 2.2/1,000 CVC days). A survey of the nurses revealed that 60% to 70% were maintaining the needleless devices correctly.

CONCLUSION:

We observed a significant increase in the BSI rate in two surgical units, SICU and OTU, associated with introduction of a needleless device. This increase occurred shortly after the needleless device was implemented and was associated with nurses' unfamiliarity with the device, and needless-device use and care practices different from the manufacturer's recommendations.

Comment in

  • Good intentions, false economy. [Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1998]
PMID:
9475345
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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