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Transplantation. 1998 Jan 27;65(2):208-12.

Effects of changes in the criteria for nationally shared kidney transplants for HLA-matched patients.

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  • 1UCLA Tissue Typing Laboratory, Department of Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles 90095, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nine years ago, a prospective trial began in all U.S. transplant centers to determine whether the results of renal transplantation would improve with the nationwide shipment of kidneys from cadaveric donors to HLA-matched patients. Since then, the stringency of criteria for HLA matching have been liberalized twice, from sharing only those kidneys that matched at all six HLA-A, -B, -DR antigens, to sharing phenotypically HLA-matched kidneys, and most recently to sharing zero HLA-mismatched kidneys.

METHODS:

Data reported to the United Network for Organ Sharing Scientific Renal Transplant Registry from October 1987 to December 1996 were analyzed to examine the transplant results of nationally shared HLA-matched kidneys and the effects of changes to the HLA matching criteria on graft survival and the distribution of HLA-matched kidneys.

RESULTS:

The overall 1-year graft survival rate of 5102 HLA-matched transplants was 88% compared with 81% for 58,207 recipients of kidneys with at least one HLA mismatch (P < 0.001). HLA-matched kidneys had a projected 12-year graft half-life, 50% higher than the 8-year half-life of mismatched grafts (P < 0.01). After the first change in the match criteria in August 1990, 1365 phenotypically matched kidneys with fewer than six HLA antigens identified had an 89% 1-year graft survival rate compared with 84% for 466 six antigen-matched kidneys transplanted before the change. After March 1995, 1067 zero HLA-mismatched kidneys that were not phenotypically identical nor six antigen matched, had a 1-year graft survival rate of 88%. Graft survival has not decreased as a result of these changes in the criteria for national sharing, despite an increase in the percentage of matched transplants from 2.5% during the six antigen-match era to 15.5% during the zero antigen-mismatch era.

CONCLUSIONS:

Changes to the United Network for Organ Sharing policy for national sharing of HLA-matched kidneys have increased the number of patients, and especially minority patients, who can benefit by receiving a well-matched graft without compromising the high graft survival rates provided by an HLA-matched kidney.

PMID:
9458016
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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