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Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1997 Nov;16(11):821-6.

Predictors and outcome of early- versus late-onset major bacterial infections in liver transplant recipients receiving tacrolimus (FK506) as primary immunosuppression.

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  • 1Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institution, Pennsylvania 15420, USA.

Abstract

Major bacterial infections and the predictors of early (within 100 days of transplantation) versus late onset (after 100 days post-transplant) bacterial infections were prospectively assessed in 130 consecutive liver transplant recipients receiving tacrolimus (FK506) as primary immunosuppression. The median follow-up period was 38 months. Overall, 35% (45/130) of the patients developed 67 episodes of major bacterial infections (0.52 episodes/patient). Sixty-three percent of the major bacterial infections occurred early, and 37% occurred in the late post-transplant period. Eighty-four percent of the abdominal infections occurred early, whereas 38% of the cases of pneumonia, 60% of the cases of primary bacteremia, and 50% of the biliary infections occurred late. By logistic regression analysis, portal vein thrombosis was the most significant independent risk factor for early-onset major bacterial infection (odds ratio 4.1; 95% CI 1.4-12.2), and recurrent hepatitis C was the most significant independent predictor of late-onset major bacterial infections (odds ratio 6.21; 95% CI 1.9-20.2). Thus, sources and risk factors differ for early versus late-onset bacterial infections after liver transplantation. Knowledge of the differences in the potential sources, the pathogens, and the predictors of early versus late-onset bacterial infections can be valuable in the evaluation and empiric treatment of liver transplant recipients with bacterial infections.

PMID:
9447904
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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