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Am J Physiol. 1997 Dec;273(6 Pt 1):C1947-56.

Changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration induced by L-type Ca2+ channel current in guinea pig gastric myocytes.

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  • 1Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea.

Abstract

We investigated the relationship between voltage-operated Ca2+ channel current and the corresponding intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) change (Ca2+ transient) in guinea pig gastric myocytes. Fluorescence microspectroscopy was combined with conventional whole cell patch-clamp technique, and fura 2 (80 microM) was added to CsCl-rich pipette solution. Step depolarization to 0 mV induced inward Ca2+ current (ICa) and concomitantly raised [Ca2+]i. Both responses were suppressed by nicardipine, an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, and the voltage dependence of Ca2+ transient was similar to the current-voltage relation of ICa. When pulse duration was increased by up to 900 ms, peak Ca2+ transient increased and reached a steady state when stimulation was for longer. The calculated fast Ca2+ buffering capacity (B value), determined as the ratio of the time integral of ICa divided by the amplitude of Ca2+ transient, was not significantly increased after depletion of Ca2+ stores by the cyclic application of caffeine (10 mM) in the presence of ryanodine (4 microM). The addition of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, 10 microM), a sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor, decreased B value by approximately 20% in a reversible manner. When KCl pipette solution was used, Ca(2+)-activated K+ current [IK(Ca)] was also recorded during step depolarization. CPA sensitively suppressed the initial peak and oscillations of IK(Ca) with irregular effects on Ca2+ transients. The above results suggest that, in guinea pig gastric myocyte, Ca2+ transient is tightly coupled to ICa during depolarization, and global [Ca2+]i is not significantly affected by Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum during depolarization.

PMID:
9435500
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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