Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Intern Med. 1997 Oct;242(4):339-47.

Homocysteine, atherosclerosis and prevalent cardiovascular disease in the elderly: The Rotterdam Study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical School, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Elevated homocysteine increases the risk of vascular disease, in particular amongst younger subjects (< 60 years). Very few studies have been performed amongst older subjects. We evaluated the relation of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) to atherosclerosis and symptomatic cardiovascular disease amongst older men and women.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

General population.

SUBJECTS:

A random sample of 630 men and women, participating in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based cohort study amongst 7983 subjects aged 55 years and over residing in the Ommoord district of Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Carotid atherosclerosis (carotid plaques and common carotid intima-media thickness) assessed by ultrasonography; lower extremity (peripheral) artery atherosclerosis measured by the ratio of the ankle to arm systolic blood pressure; prevalent cardiovascular disease assessed as a history of myocardial infarction or stroke.

RESULTS:

Subjects, 55-74 years of age, with elevated tHcy levels (+/- 18.6 mumol L-1) had a thicker common carotid intima-media (difference 0.037 mm; 95% CI 0.001, 0.073), a lower ankle-arm index (-0.054; -0.104, -0.004), and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (odds ratio 3.0; 1.5, 6.1), after adjusting for sex and age. There was no appreciable association of tHcy levels to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in subjects aged 75 years and older.

CONCLUSIONS:

In subjects aged 55-74 years elevated tHcy is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The lack of association in those aged > or = 75 years most probably reflect selective mortality.

PMID:
9366813
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk