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Stroke. 1997 Oct;28(10):1956-60.

S-100 protein and neuron-specific enolase concentrations in blood as indicators of infarction volume and prognosis in acute ischemic stroke.

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  • 1Department of Neuroradiology, Ludwig Maximilian University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich, Germany. missler@ikra.med.uni-muenchen.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Better techniques are needed to monitor infarction volume and predict neurological outcome after ischemic brain infarction. We evaluated the usefulness of serial measurements of S-100 protein versus neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in blood samples from patients with acute stroke.

METHODS:

Using nonisotopic sandwich immunoassays, we measured plasma concentrations of S-100 protein and NSE on admission and on days 3, 4, 7, and 14 after infarction in 44 patients (age range, 22 to 86 years; mean age, 65.1 years; 12 female, 32 male). Infarct volume was measured by volumetric CT on day 4 after ictus, and clinical outcome was assessed at discharge from hospital with the Activities of Daily Living Scale and 6 months after infarction with the Glasgow Outcome Scale.

RESULTS:

Peak blood levels of S-100 protein were found on day 2.5 +/- 1.3, and peak levels of NSE were found on day 1.9 +/- 0.8 after infarction. Peak plasma levels of S-100 protein correlated well with infarct volume (r = .75, P < .001) and with clinical outcome assessed with the Glasgow Outcome Scale (r = .51, P < .001). Serum levels of NSE correlated with infarct volume (r = .37, P < .05) but not with clinical outcome (r = .18, P > .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of our study indicate that measuring blood concentrations of S-100 protein periodically in the first 10 days after cerebral infarction helps to predict infarct volume and the long-term neurological outcome more accurately than periodic measurements of blood concentrations of NSE.

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PMID:
9341703
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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