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Ann Surg. 1997 Sep;226(3):229-36; discussion 236-7.

Routine pulmonary artery catheterization does not reduce morbidity and mortality of elective vascular surgery: results of a prospective, randomized trial.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The authors determined whether the preoperative placement of a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) with optimization of hemodynamics results in outcome improvement after elective vascular surgery.

SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA:

The PAC commonly is used not only in patients who are critically ill, but also perioperatively in major elective surgery. Few prospective studies exist documenting its usefulness.

METHODS:

One hundred four consecutive patients were randomized to have a PAC placed the morning of operation (group I) or to have a PAC placed only if clinically indicated (group II). Group I patients were resuscitated to preestablished endpoints before surgery and kept at these points both intraoperatively and postoperatively. Group II patients received standard care.

RESULTS:

There was one death in each group. An intraoperative or postoperative complication developed in 13 patients in group I versus 7 patients in group II (p = not significant). Group I patients received more fluid than did group II patients (5137 +/- 315 mL vs. 3789 +/- 306 mL; p < 0.003). There was no significant difference in either overall or surgical intensive care unit length of stay. Only one patient in group II required a postoperative PAC.

CONCLUSIONS:

Routine PAC use in elective vascular surgery increases the volume of fluid given to patients without demonstrable improvement in morbidity or mortality.

PMID:
9339929
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1191013
Free PMC Article
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