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Schizophr Res. 1997 Aug 29;26(2-3):181-90.

Violence in schizophrenia: role of hallucinations and delusions.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

The study examines the relationship between hallucinations/delusions and violent behaviour in a sample of long-stay inpatients with chronic schizophrenia. Thirty-one subjects defined as violent and meeting DSM-111-R criteria for schizophrenia were compared with 31 matched non-violent schizophrenia patients with respect to detailed phenomenologies of auditory hallucinations using the Mental Health Research Institute Unusual Perceptions Schedule (Carter and Copolov, 1993; Carter et al., 1995) and delusions using the Maudsley Assessment of Delusions Schedule (Taylor et al., 1994). Patients in the violent groups were significantly more likely to experience negative emotions, tone and content related to their voices than those in the non-violent group, whilst patients in the non-violent group were more likely to experience positive emotions, tone and content related to their voices. Patients in the non-violent group were significantly more likely to report success in coping with their voices. There was no association between command hallucinations and violent behaviour. Patients in the violent group were more likely to hold persecutory delusional beliefs than those in the non-violent group, while patients in the non-violent group were likely to hold grandiose delusions than those in the violent group. Patients in the violent group were also more likely to report that the delusion made them feel angry, while those in the non-violent group were more likely to report that the delusion made them feel elated. The results suggest specific aspects of the phenomenologies of hallucinations and delusions that should be clinically assessed to determine the likelihood of violence as a result of such psychotic symptoms.

PMID:
9323349
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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