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J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Aug;35(8):2107-10.

Detection of group B rotaviruses in fecal samples from diarrheic calves and adult cows and characterization of their VP7 genes.

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  • 1Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster 44691, USA.

Abstract

Groups A, B, and C rotaviruses have been identified in cattle. Group B rotaviruses are associated with sporadic cases of diarrhea in calves and adult cows. From diagnostic submissions to our laboratory, 90 fecal samples from cases of calf diarrhea, 81 fecal samples from cases of adult cow diarrhea (winter dysentery), and 20 fecal samples from case control normal adult cows were tested for group B rotaviruses by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR (targeting 279 bp of the VP7 gene). In addition, 53 fecal samples from diarrheic adult cows were tested for group B rotaviruses by immune electron microscopy (IEM). By RT-PCR, five samples from calves were group B rotavirus positive (5.6%). Fifteen samples from adult cows with diarrhea were group B rotavirus positive (18.5%), and none of the control fecal samples from normal cows were positive for group B rotaviruses. By PAGE, one calf sample (RT-PCR positive) was group B rotavirus positive (short electropherotype), but none of the adult cow samples were positive for group B rotaviruses. By IEM, 5 (9.4%) of the 53 fecal samples from diarrheic adult cows were group B positive (all were also RT-PCR positive). The VP7 genes of three strains (WD653 from an adult cow and the ATI and Mebus calf strains) were sequenced. The VP7 genes from the three bovine strains showed high (over 90%) nucleotide and deduced amino acid homologies, but lower homologies (48 to 61%) were seen between these genes and the genes from rodent (IDIR) and human (ADRV) group B rotaviruses. Although there were some differences of degree, all inoculated gnotobiotic calves (n = 6) showed abnormal feces between 1 and 3 days after inoculation with each of three strains of group B bovine rotaviruses, and group B rotaviruse, were detected in the feces for up to 2 weeks by RT-PCR but for shorter periods by PAGE or IEM.

PMID:
9230391
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC229912
Free PMC Article
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