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Int Immunol. 1997 Jun;9(6):889-96.

Impaired antigen presentation by murine I-Ad class II MHC molecules expressed in normal and HLA-DM-defective human B cell lines.

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  • 1Division of Molecular Medicine, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.

Abstract

The inability of certain antigen processing mutant cell lines to present intact proteins to T cells and to form SDS-stable MHC class II dimers has been shown to result from defective expression of HLA-encoded DMA and DMB genes. We have utilized some of these mutants to determine species compatibility of antigen presentation components. Mouse MHC class II I-Ad cDNA was transfected into the human B cell lymphoblastoid cell lines 8.1.6, 7.9.6 (a mutant cell line derived from 8.1.6) and an independent deletion mutant T2 (called 8.1.6d, 7.9.6d and T2.d respectively). These cells were than examined for various functions in antigen presentation. Interestingly, none of the cells transfected with I-Ad presented peptides derived from intact proteins to specific T cell hybridomas. However, presentation of synthetic peptides by these cells was normal. The ability to form SDS-stable dimers was dramatically reduced in the transfectants. In addition, I-Ad molecules at the cell surface appeared loaded predominantly with the invariant chain peptides, CLIP. These properties of the I-Ad transfectants are identical to those described for HLA class II molecules expressed in HLA-DM mutants. Perhaps the most interesting finding was the inability of I-Ad in 8.1.6 to present protein antigens. Since 8.1.6 cells present antigens to HLA-DR, DP, DQ-restricted T cells and also have intact HLA-DM and invariant chain (II) functions, these results argue that some component of human antigen processing machinery is incompatible with I-Ad molecules.

PMID:
9199972
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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