Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Arch Environ Health. 1997 May-Jun;52(3):160-8.

Air pollution, temperature, and regional differences in lung cancer mortality in Japan.

Author information

  • 1Department of Environmental Medicine and Informatics, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

Abstract

In this study, the authors investigated regional differences in lung cancer mortality in Japan, and, based on data acquired between 1970 and 1990 for 47 Japanese prefectures, estimated the relationship between regional lung cancer mortality and air pollution and/or temperature. Investigators used data for nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, motor vehicle density, tobacco expenditure, and temperature as independent variables for age-adjusted lung cancer death rates. The age-adjusted lung cancer death rates were higher in the southern geographical block of Japan (i.e., approximately 1.2-fold in males and 1.1-fold in females) and in the northern block (approximately 1.2-fold in males) than in the central block. The regional differences in the age-adjusted lung cancer death rates were explained by nitrogen dioxide and temperature. Temperature caused a greater effect (regression coefficients) of nitrogen dioxide on the age-adjusted lung cancer death rates than did nitrogen dioxide alone in the southern block (i.e., approximately 1.3-fold in males and 1.2-fold in females). These results provide the first evidence of a possible synergistic interaction between air pollution and high temperature on lung cancer mortality.

PMID:
9169624
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk