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Eur J Clin Chem Clin Biochem. 1997 Jan;35(1):41-5.

Discrimination between normal wildtype and carriers of coagulation factor V Leiden mutation by the activated protein C resistance test in the presence of factor V deficient plasma.

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  • 1Medizinisch-Diagnostisches Institut, Klinikum Karlsruhe gGmbH, Germany.

Abstract

Blood samples from 104 patients with clinically suspected thrombophilia were analyzed for coagulation factor V Leiden mutation (1691, G-->A) by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. In 86 individuals (82.7%), the mutation was not detectable, whereas 15 patients (14.4%) were heterozygous and three patients (2.9%) were homozygous for factor V Leiden mutation. Plasma samples from these individuals were also tested for functional resistance of coagulation factor V to activated protein C (activated protein C resistance). This test was performed on a Schnitger-Gross coagulometer using an activated partial thromboplastin time-based activated protein C resistance test modified by applying a 1 : 5 dilution with factor V-deficiency plasma. All the individuals negative for factor V Leiden mutation were also negative in the functional activated protein C resistance test. On the other hand, all patients carrying the mutation revealed pathologic results in the activated protein C resistance test. The cutoff value for the activated protein C resistance index (> or = 1.7 = negative) was determined by testing 31 male and female blood donors. One of them was heterozygous for factor V Leiden mutation and had an activated protein C resistance index of 1.4, whereas those without factor V Leiden mutation had an activated protein C resistance index of 1.9 +/- 0.1 (mean +/- SD). Patients with clinically suspected thrombophilia without factor V Leiden mutation had an activated protein C resistance index of 2.1 +/- 0.2 (mean +/- SD), whereas patients heterozygous for the mutation had an index of 1.5 +/- 0.1 (mean +/- SD). Within the group of patients carrying the mutation, the activated protein C resistance test even distinguished between heterozygous and three homozygous (activated protein C resistance 1.0 to 1.2) carriers. The data demonstrate that the activated protein C resistance test in the presence of factor V-deficiency plasma provides a clear-cut discrimination between normal wildtype and carriers of factor V Leiden mutation with a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Verification of positive activated protein C resistance tests can be performed easily with a simple and reliable polymerase chain reaction protocol for the 1691, G-->A mutation.

PMID:
9156566
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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