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EMBO J. 1997 Apr 15;16(8):2054-60.

mof, a putative acetyl transferase gene related to the Tip60 and MOZ human genes and to the SAS genes of yeast, is required for dosage compensation in Drosophila.

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  • 1Department of Biology and Graduate Program in Genetics and Molecular Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Abstract

Dosage compensation is a regulatory process that insures that males and females have equal amounts of X-chromosome gene products. In Drosophila, this is achieved by a 2-fold enhancement of X-linked gene transcription in males, relative to females. The enhancement of transcription is mediated by the activity of a group of regulatory genes characterized by the male-specific lethality of their loss-of-function alleles. The products of these genes form a complex that is preferentially associated with numerous sites on the X chromosome in somatic cells of males but not of females. Binding of the dosage compensation complex is correlated with a significant increase in the presence of a specific histone isoform, histone 4 acetylated at Lys16, on this chromosome. Experimental results and sequence analysis suggest that an additional gene, males-absent on the first (mof), encodes a putative acetyl transferase that plays a direct role in the specific histone acetylation associated with dosage compensation. The predicted amino acid sequence of MOF exhibits a significant level of similarity to several other proteins, including the human HIV-1 Tat interactive protein Tip60, the human monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein MOZ and the yeast silencing proteins SAS3 and SAS2.

PMID:
9155031
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1169808
Free PMC Article
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