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Am J Psychiatry. 1997 Feb;154(2):263-5.

Major depression following smoking cessation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia, University, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The authors examined the incidence and predictors of major depression following successful smoking cessation treatment, with special attention to the influence of past major depression.

METHOD:

Three-month follow-up data were obtained from 126 subjects who successfully completed a 10-week smoking cessation program.

RESULTS:

The 3-month incidence of new major depression following treatment for nicotine dependence was 2%, 17%, and 30% among subjects with histories of no major depression, single major depression, and recurrent major depression, respectively. A history of major depression and persistent withdrawal symptoms independently predicted posttreatment major depression.

CONCLUSIONS:

Continued patient care beyond the 2-4-week period associated with the nicotine withdrawal syndrome is indicated when abstinence is attempted by smokers with prior major depression.

PMID:
9016279
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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