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J Vasc Surg. 1997 Jan;25(1):29-38.

Impact of arterial surgery and balloon angioplasty on amputation: a population-based study of 1155 procedures between 1973 and 1992.

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  • 1Division of Vascular Surgery, Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Limited population-based data are available on trends in the incidence of arterial surgery, balloon angioplasty, and amputation for arterial occlusive disease of the legs over the past two decades.

METHODS:

We identified all elective and emergency arterial operations, balloon angioplasty procedures, and amputations performed for all residents of a defined community, Olmsted County, Minn., between 1973 and 1992. We focused on gender mix, type of procedure, and secular trends in utilization.

RESULTS:

A total of 1155 procedures were performed, including 733 arterial surgical procedures, 59 balloon angioplasty procedures, and 363 amputations (288 major and 75 minor). Emergency procedures were performed in 12%. Suprainguinal inflow procedures were the most common arterial reconstruction (60%) compared with infrainguinal procedures (40%). The incidence of all revascularization procedures increased in the first decade but reached a plateau after 1985. Utilization rates of revascularization procedures from 1988 to 1992 were higher for men (141.9/100,000 person-years [p-yr]) than women (57.4/100,000 p-yr.). Angioplasty (17.0/100,000 p-yr) rates lagged behind surgery until 1985, but tripled in the past 10 years and have not yet reached a plateau. Although minor amputation rates remain unchanged in 20 years, major amputation rates have been reduced by 50% from 36.7/100,000 p-yr between 1973 and 1977 to 19.0/100,000 p-yr from 1988 to 1992.

CONCLUSIONS:

From this long-term population-based analysis (1973 to 1992), we conclude that increased vascular surgery and balloon angioplasty rates have coincided with a significant reduction in major amputation rates in the past 10 years.

PMID:
9013905
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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