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Cathet Cardiovasc Diagn. 1997 Jan;40(1):101-8.

Pulse-spray thrombolysis in acutely obstructed coronary artery in critical situations.

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  • 1Cardiovascular Division, Kumamoto Central Hospital, Japan.

Abstract

Pulse-spray thrombolysis (PST) was performed to treat large coronary thrombus in 3 patients in critical situations. The originally developed pump system and a custom infusion catheter (SciMed/Boston Scientific, Maple Grove, MN) were used in combination. Case 1, a 48-yr-old male with extensive anterior myocardial infarction, failed to be recanalized by systemic thrombolysis. He underwent emergent coronary angiography, which revealed proximal occlusion of a large left anterior descending artery (LAD). TIMI 3 flow was achieved after 20 min with 200,000 units of urokinese by PST, followed by balloon angioplasty. In case 2, a 57-yr-old male, subacute stent thrombosis occurred 4 days after two and a half Palmatz-Schatz stents were implanted in mid-LAD. TIMI 3 flow was recovered at 20 min with 240,000 units of urokinese and an additional 72,000 units of rt-PA, followed by redilatation with a quarter-size larger balloon than that used in stent deployment. In case 3, a 70-yr-old male, during ultrasound study for unstable angina, a massive thrombotic complication occurred which occluded the left main trunk. PST was immediately performed under cardiac resuscitation, and the patient recovered from shock after 15 min. TIMI 3 flow was restored after 25 min. Two Palmatz-Schatz stents were implanted after thrombus completely disappeared. There were no complications, including distal embolization, intimal dissection, or bleeding. There was also no recurrence of the ischemic event. PST may be considered a potential treatment modality for coronary artery disease where large thrombus plays a major role.

PMID:
8993826
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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