Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Biol Chem. 1996 Nov 1;271(44):27942-7.

The role of betagamma and alphagamma complexes in the assembly of human fibrinogen.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-7350, USA.

Abstract

The role of alphagamma and betagamma dimers as intermediates in the assembly of fibrinogen was examined in cell fusion experiments using stably transfected baby hamster kidney cell lines expressing one or combinations of fibrinogen chains. Fibrinogen was readily formed and secreted into the culture media when cells co-expressing beta and gamma chains and generating betagamma complexes were fused with cells expressing only the alpha chain. Likewise, when cells co-expressing alpha and gamma chains and generating alphagamma complexes were fused with cells expressing only the beta chain, fibrinogen was also formed and secreted. The relative amounts of alphagamma or betagamma intermediates observed during fibrinogen biosynthesis were determined by the levels of the component chains; i.e. when the beta chain was limiting, the alphagamma dimer was the predominant intermediate; likewise, when the alpha chain was limiting, the betagamma complex was the predominant intermediate. The incorporation of preformed alphagamma and betagamma complexes into secreted fibrinogen did not require concurrent protein synthesis, as shown by experiments employing cycloheximide. These data strongly support the role of alphagamma and betagamma complexes as functional intermediates in the assembly of fibrinogen.

PMID:
8910396
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

LinkOut - more resources

Full Text Sources

Other Literature Sources

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk