Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Colorectal Dis. 1996;11(3):119-21.

Is early postoperative feeding feasible in elective colon and rectal surgery?

Author information

  • 1Surgical Department, Virgen del Camino Hospital, Pamplona, Spain.

Abstract

In reports on earlier non-prospectively randomized trials the authors have claimed that early oral postoperative feeding is a unique benefit of laparoscopic surgery. On the other hand, some authors have suggested that early feeding could be tolerated by the majority of patients after elective open surgery.

AIM:

This prospective randomized study was undertaken to assess the feasibility and safety of immediate oral feeding in patients subjected to elective open colorectal surgery.

METHODS:

This trial included 190 patients who underwent an elective colon or rectal operation. Patients were randomized after the operative procedure into one of two groups. Group I (n = 95): On the first evening after the operation, patients were allowed ab libitum intake of clear liquids; this continued until the first postoperative day at which time they progressed to a regular diet as desired. Group II (n = 95): In this group the nasogastric tube was removed when the surgeon considered that postoperative ileus had been resolved.

RESULTS:

Early oral intake was tolerated by 79.6% of the patients in the first 4 days in group I; there were no differences between the two groups from the 4th day on. The incidence of vomiting and nasogastric tube insertion (21.5%) was higher in patients in group I than in those in group II. The time until the first bowel movement was 4.3 days in group I and 4.7 days in group II. Complications appeared in 17.3% of the patients in group I and in 19.3% in group II.

CONCLUSION:

This study has objectively demonstrated that early oral feeding is feasible and safe in patients who have elective colorectal surgery.

PMID:
8811376
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk