Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nature. 1996 Sep 12;383(6596):160-3.

The dosage compensation system of Drosophila is co-opted by newly evolved X chromosomes.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, California 94305, USA.

Abstract

In species where males and females differ in number of sex chromosomes, the expression of sex-linked genes is equalized by a process known as dosage compensation. In Drosophila melanogaster, dosage compensation is mediated by the binding of the products of the male-specific lethal (msl) genes to the single male X chromosome. Here we report that the sex- and chromosome-specific binding of three of the msl proteins (MSLs) occurs in other drosophilid species, spanning four genera. Moreover, we show that MSL binding correlates with the evolution of the sex chromosomes: in species that have acquired a second X chromosome arm because of an X-autosome translocation, we observe binding of the MSLs to the 'new' (previously autosomal) arm of the X chromosome, only when its homologue has degenerated. Moreover, in Drosophila miranda, a Y-autosome translocation has produced a new X chromosome (called neo-X), only some regions of which are dosage compensated. In this neo-X chromosome, the pattern of MSL binding correlates with the known pattern of dosage compensation.

PMID:
8774878
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk