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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1996 Jul;98(1):32-8.

A comparison of effects of triamcinolone acetonide aqueous nasal spray, oral prednisone, and placebo on adrenocortical function in male patients with allergic rhinitis.

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  • 1Healthquest Research, Austin, Texas 78759, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

One of the risks associated with the use of oral corticosteroids is suppression of adrenocortical function. Triamcinolone acetonide (TAA) aqueous nasal spray administered once daily (110 micrograms and 220 micrograms) has been shown to reduce allergic rhinitis symptoms.

OBJECTIVE:

This multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind study determined the effects of TAA aqueous nasal spray, placebo, and oral prednisone on adrenocortical function in patients with allergic rhinitis.

METHODS:

Sixty-four patients received TAA aqueous nasal spray (220 micrograms or 440 micrograms), oral prednisone (10 mg), or placebo once daily for 6 weeks. Adrenocortical function was assessed after cosyntropin stimulation for 6 hours before treatment and after 6 weeks of treatment.

RESULTS:

There was no statistically significant effect on adrenocortical function in patients who received either dose of TAA aqueous nasal spray compared with placebo. In contrast, prednisone produced statistically significant (p < 0.001) reductions in adrenocortical function compared with placebo; reductions occurred in both the mean 6-hour plasma cortisol levels and mean change in 6-hour plasma cortisol levels from pretreatment.

CONCLUSION:

This study demonstrated that, unlike oral prednisone, TAA aqueous nasal spray, in therapeutic doses, did not alter adrenocortical function and was comparable to treatment with placebo in its absence of measurable effects on adrenocortical function.

PMID:
8765815
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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