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Pediatr Pulmonol. 1996 May;21(5):267-75.

Bronchoalveolar lavage or oropharyngeal cultures to identify lower respiratory pathogens in infants with cystic fibrosis.

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  • 1Department of Thoracic Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Australia.

Abstract

As collections of lower respiratory tract specimens from young children with cystic fibrosis (CF) are difficult, we determined whether oropharyngeal cultures predicted lower airway pathogens. During 1992-1994, 75 of 90 (83%) infants with CF diagnosed by neonatal screening had 150 simultaneous bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and oropharyngeal specimens collected for quantitative bacterial culture at a mean age of 17 months (range, 1-52). Ten children undergoing bronchoscopy for stridor served as controls. Total and differential cell counts and interleukin-8 concentrations were measured in BAL fluid. A subset of bacterial pathogens were typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. A non-linear relationship with inflammatory markers supported a diagnosis of lower airway infection when > or = 10(5) colony-forming units/ml were detected. This criterion was met in 47 (31%) BAL cultures from 37 (49%) children. Staphylococcus aureus (19%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (11%), and Hemophilus influenzae (8%) were the major lower airway pathogens. In oropharyngeal cultures, S. aureus (47%), Escherichia coli (23%), H. influenzae (15%), and P. aeruginosa (13%) predominated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of oropharyngeal cultures for pathogens causing lower respiratory infections were 82%, 83%, 41%, and 97%, respectively. When there was agreement between paired oropharyngeal and BAL cultures, genetic fingerprinting showed some strains of the same organism were unrelated. We conclude that oropharyngeal cultures do not reliably predict the presence of bacterial pathogens in the lower airways of young CF children.

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PMID:
8726151
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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