Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Cell Biol. 1996 Jul;134(2):487-97.

Cutaneous overexpression of NT-3 increases sensory and sympathetic neuron number and enhances touch dome and hair follicle innervation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pathology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington 40536, USA. kmalbe00@pop.uky.edu

Abstract

Target-derived influences of nerve growth factor on neuronal survival and differentiation are well documented, though effects of other neurotrophins are less clear. To examine the influence of NT-3 neurotrophin overexpression in a target tissue of sensory and sympathetic neurons, transgenic mice were isolated that overexpress NT-3 in the epidermis. Overexpression of NT-3 led to a 42% increase in the number of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons, a 70% increase in the number of trigeminal sensory neurons, and a 32% increase in sympathetic neurons. Elevated NT-3 also caused enlargement of touch dome mechanoreceptor units, sensory end organs innervated by slowly adapting type 1 (SA1) neurons. The enlarged touch dome units of the transgenics had an increased number of associated Merkel cells, cells at which SA1s terminate. An additional alteration of skin innervation in NT-3 transgenics was an increased density of myelinated circular endings associated with the piloneural complex. The enhancement of innervation to the skin was accompanied by a doubling in the number of sensory neurons expressing trkC. In addition, measures of nerve fibers in cross-sectional profiles of cutaneous saphenous nerves of transgenics showed a 60% increase in myelinated fibers. These results indicate that in vivo overexpression of NT-3 by the epidermis enhances the number of sensory and sympathetic neurons and the development of selected sensory endings of the skin.

PMID:
8707832
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2120868
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk