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Metabolism. 1996 Jul;45(7):797-803.

The effect of physical activity on serum total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations varies with apolipoprotein E phenotype in male children and young adults: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

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  • 1Helsinki Research Institute for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

Apolipoprotein E (apo E) determines serum total (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) cholesterol concentrations and is thus associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. We studied if the effect of physical activity (PA) on serum TC and LDL-C concentrations varies with apo E phenotype in a population-based sample of children and young adults with regular PA. The study cohort consisted of subjects aged 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, and 24 years in 1986 (N = 1,498) participating in a large multicenter study of cardiovascular risk factors in children and young adults. Serum lipid concentrations were determined enzymatically, and apo E phenotypes by isoelectric focusing and immunoblotting. The composition of the diet was determined by a 48-hour recall method, and a PA index was calculated on the basis of frequency, intensity, and duration of activity assessed by a questionnaire. LDL-C (P = .0082), TC (P = .014), and the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)/TC ratio (P = .0004) responses to exercise varied with apo E phenotype. The effect of PA on LDL-C, TC, or HDL/TC was not found in apo E phenotype E4/4. A moderate inverse effect of PA on TC and LDL-C and a positive effect on HDL/TC was found in subjects with E4/3 and E3/3 phenotypes. Similar but stronger associations were found between these variables within the group of E3/2 males. The effect of PA on serum lipid levels was strongest within the phenotype E3/2. These associations were not explained by dietary habits. Apo E phenotype partly determines the effect of PA on serum TC and LDL-C in Finnish male children and young adults with regular PA.

PMID:
8692011
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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