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Biochem J. 1996 Apr 15;315 ( Pt 2):523-31.

Prediction from sequence comparisons of residues of factor H involved in the interaction with complement component C3b.

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  • 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, U.K.

Abstract

The amino acid sequence of the region of bovine factor H containing the C3b binding site has been derived from sequencing overlapping cDNA clones. A cDNA sequence encoding 669 amino acids was obtained. Like human and mouse factor H the sequence can be arranged into a number of internally homologous units (CPs), each of which is about 60 amino acids long and is based on a framework of four conserved cysteine residues. Bovine factor H is of the same molecular mass as human and mouse factor H, and is therefore likely to be composed of 20 contiguous CPs. Comparisons with human and mouse factor H indicate that the partial bovine sequence encodes CPs 2-12 inclusive of bovine factor H. Bovine factor H binds to human ammonia-treated C3 (causing thiolester cleavage) [C3(NH3)] and promotes the cleavage of human C3(NH3) in the presence of bovine factor I. Other studies indicate that CPs 2-5 of human factor H encompass the C3b binding and factor I cofactor activity site. Multiple sequence alignments of human factor H, mouse factor H (which also interacts with human C3b) and bovine factor H with CP modules whose structures have been determined experimentally, have been used to predict residues in the hypervariable loops of CPs 2-5 and to identify residues of potential importance in human C3 binding and factor I cofactor activity. Leu-17 and Gly-20 of CP 2, Ser-17, Ala-19, Glu-21, Asp-23 and Glu-25 of CP 3 and Lys-18 of CP 4 are all conserved between the three species. It may be that CPs 3 and 4 interact with C3(NH3) directly, whilst CPs 2 and 5 maintain the correct orientation for CPs 3 and 4 to interact.

PMID:
8615824
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1217227
Free PMC Article
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