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J Clin Invest. 1996 Feb 15;97(4):941-8.

Hepatic and neuromuscular forms of glycogen storage disease type IV caused by mutations in the same glycogen-branching enzyme gene.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

Abstract

Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD-IV) is an autosomal recessive disease resulting from deficient glycogen-branching enzyme (GBE) activity. The classic and most common form is progressive liver cirrhosis and failure leading to either liver transplantation or death by 5 yr of age. However, the liver disease is not always progressive. In addition, a neuromuscular type of the disease has been reported. The molecular basis of GSD-IV is not known, nor is there a known reason for the clinical variability. We studied the GBE gene in patients with various presentations of GSD-IV. Three point mutations in the GBE gene were found in two patients with the classical presentation: R515C, F257L, and R524X. Transient expression experiments showed that these mutations inactivated GBE activity. Two point mutations, L224P and Y329S, were detected in two separate alleles of a patient with the nonprogressive hepatic form. The L224P resulted in complete loss of GBE activity, whereas the Y329S resulted in loss of approximately 50% of GBE activity. The Y329S allele was also detected in another patient with the nonprogressive form of GSD-IV but not in 35 unrelated controls or in patients with the more severe forms of GSD-IV. A 210-bp deletion from nucleotide 873 to 1082 of the GBE cDNA was detected in a patient with the fatal neonatal neuromuscular presentation. This deletion, representing the loss of one full exon, was caused by a 3' acceptor splicing site mutation (ag to aa). The deletion abolished GBE activity. Our studies indicate that the three different forms of GSD-IV were caused by mutations in the same GBE gene. The data also suggest that the significant retention of GBE activity in the Y329S allele may be a reason for the mild disease. Further study of genotype/phenotype correlations may yield useful information in predicting the clinical outcomes.

PMID:
8613547
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC507139
Free PMC Article
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