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Obstet Gynecol. 1996 Apr;87(4):575-80.

Trends in the percentage of women who received no prenatal care in the United States, 1980-1992: contributions of the demographic and risk effects.

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  • 1Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if the increase in the percentage of women who received no prenatal care in the United States relative to 1980 (from 1.3% in 1980 to 2.2% in 1989 and 1.7% in 1992) was due to increasing risks of no care in subgroups of women or increasing percentages of births to women at high demographic risk of no care.

METHODS:

We analyzed U.S. birth certificates for the period 1980-1992. The annual adjusted odds of no prenatal care relative to 1980 were computed by logistic regression models that included year, maternal characteristics, and interactions of these characteristics with year. We also examined changes in the annual distributions of births by maternal characteristics.

RESULTS:

The risk of no prenatal care in most subgroups increased during the early 1980s, peaked in the late 1980s, and declined thereafter. For example, among black women, the adjusted risk of no care more than doubled from 1980 to 1989. Throughout the 1980s and into the 1990s, the percentage of births to women at high demographic risk of no care increased. This increase in the percentage of births to women at high demographic risk shows no sign of abating.

CONCLUSIONS:

During the 1980s, increasing risks in subgroups of women drove the increase in the crude rate of no prenatal care. Despite decreases in the risks of no care in the early 1990s, increasing percentages of births to women with high demographic risk for no care prevented a decrease in the crude rate to the 1980 level.

PMID:
8602311
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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