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Cancer Causes Control. 1995 Nov;6(6):532-8.

Green-tea consumption and risk of stomach cancer: a population-based case-control study in Shanghai, China.

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  • 1Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shanghai Medical University, P.R., China.

Abstract

The effect of drinking Chinese green tea on the risk of stomach cancer was evaluated in a population-based case-control study conducted in Shanghai, China, from October 1991 to December 1993. Eligible cases were incident cases of primary stomach cancer diagnosed during the study period among residents of Hongkou district and Nanhui county aged under 80 years. Controls were selected from the same street or commune where the case resided and were matched to the cases on age (within three years) and gender. A total of 711 cases and 711 matched controls, more than 90 percent of the eligible subjects, completed the interview. Information was obtained on the types of tea used, age when habitual tea drinking started, frequency of new batches of tea leaves used per day, number of cups brewed from each batch, total duration of drinking for each batch, strength and temperature of the tea consumed. Statistical analysis was based on modelling through conditional logistic regression. After adjusting for age, gender, place of residence, education, birthplace, alcohol consumption, and cigarette smoking, the odds ratio (OR) comparing drinkers of green tea with nondrinkers was 0.71 (95 percent confidence interval = 0.54-0.93). The adjusted OR decreased with increasing number of new batches of the green tea consumed each day (P value trend = 0.006). With the largest series of stomach cancer cases to date, this study found green-tea consumption associated with lower risk of stomach cancer. Among drinkers of green tea, the risk of stomach cancer did not depend on the age when habitual green-tea drinking started. Green tea may disrupt gastric carcinogenesis at both the intermediate and the late stages.

PMID:
8580302
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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