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Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1995 Sep 1;20(17):1910-6.

Posterior instrumentation and anterior interbody fusion for tuberculous kyphosis of dorsal and lumbar spines.

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  • 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Catholic University Medical College, Kang-Nam St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Thirty-nine adults and five children with active spinal tuberculosis and resulting kyphosis of the dorsal and lumbar spine who had combined posterior instrumentation and anterior interbody fusion were observed to determine whether the corrected spinal deformity could be maintained until solid fusion.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effectiveness of the combined two-stage procedure for treating kyphosis due to active spinal tuberculosis.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

Until 1970, with all methods of treatment, kyphosis due to active spinal tuberculosis tended to increase during therapy. Most of the patients treated with these methods were not happy with this residual kyphosis, even though their disease was arrested or cured. Kyphosis became their main concern regarding further treatment.

METHODS:

A combined two-stage procedure, under the cover of 18 months of triple chemotherapy, was used for all patients. For posterior stabilization, the Harrington distraction system, Rush nails or Steinmann pins and wires, and Texas Scottish Rite Hospital instrumentation were used. The diagnosis of successful interbody fusion was made if there was no loss of correction, no graft resorption or graft bed resorption, and if there was visible graft remodeling, such as trabeculation between the graft beds and graft and the graft hypertrophy.

RESULTS:

In the 39 adults, average preoperative, immediate postoperative, and last follow-up kyphosis angles were 37 degrees, 16 degrees, and 18 degrees, respectively. In four children, the average preoperative, immediate postoperative, and last follow-up kyphosis angles were 55 degrees, 28 degrees, and 31 degrees, respectively. The loss of correction did not exceed 3 degrees. For one-segment spondylodesis, the average fusion times were 4 months in adults and 3.5 months in children. For a two-segment fusion, the average fusion times were 6 months in adults and 6.3 months in children.

CONCLUSION:

Posterior instrumental stabilization and anterior interbody fusion were found helpful in arresting the disease early, providing early fusion, preventing progression of kyphosis, and correcting the kyphosis.

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PMID:
8560340
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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