Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Pediatr. 1996 Jan;128(1):82-8.

Stress and incidence of bleeding in children and adolescents with hemophilia.

Author information

  • 1Children's Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relationship of stress and incidence of bleeding in boys with hemophilia.

STUDY DESIGN:

We conducted a 6-month longitudinal study of 97 subjects (ages 4 to 16 years) from six hemophilia centers. Diaries recorded bleeding episodes (including site and history of previous trauma) and both child and parent daily stress. Parent and child stressful life event measures were obtained monthly. Socioeconomic data and clotting factor level were determined at enrollment. Logistic regression models examined the influence of recent stress on likelihood of bleeding on each day, controlling for factor level and socioeconomic data. We also determined associations of aggregated previous month's events with bleeding likelihood in the succeeding month.

RESULTS:

Fifty-eight percent of study participants had severe hemophilia. The sample population averaged nine bleeding episodes per 6 months; of these; two thirds of bleeding incidents occurred into joints and 44% after injury. Factor level strongly predicted bleeding incidence (p < 0.0001). Increased parent stress was associated with increased bleeding in general (odds ratio = 1.37, p < 0.003) and with injury (odds ratio = 1.65, p < 0.001), but not bleeding into joints. Similar findings followed parent reports of positive life events. Increased parent negative life events in 1 month were associated with increased bleeding in the succeeding month (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Short- and long-term parental stress may lead to increased bleeding incidence in hemophilia, although factor level much more strongly predicts bleeding.

PMID:
8551425
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk