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Gastroenterology. 1993 Jul;105(1):254-66.

Cell-mediated hepatic injury in alcoholic liver disease. Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study Group 275.

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  • 1Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Hines, Illinois.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The mechanism responsible for the initiation and perpetuation of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains poorly understood. This investigation attempted to elucidate the role of cell-mediated immune phenomena in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced liver injury.

METHODS:

Frozen liver biopsy specimens from 144 patients with moderate to severe ALD were examined by the avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase technique for the expression of antigenic markers of T and B lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and class I and II MHC molecules in the tissue.

RESULTS:

Expression of CD3 by lymphocytes correlated significantly with regenerating nodules, intralobular inflammation, central sclerosis, and abnormalities of Kupffer cells. B cells were rarely present, and natural killer cells were absent. CD3+ lymphocytes expressed either CD4 or CD8 surface molecules. Enhanced class I MHC expression correlated significantly with portal inflammation, limiting plate erosion, vascular abnormalities, and hemosiderosis. Expression of class II MHC molecules correlated significantly with necrosis, bile stasis, and Mallory bodies.

CONCLUSIONS:

The distribution and persistence of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in actively advancing ALD, the enhanced MHC expression on hepatocytes, and their relationship to alcoholic hyalin and necrosis lend support to the hypothesis that a cytotoxic T lymphocyte-hepatocyte interaction plays a role, perhaps via lymphokine production, in the genesis or perpetuation of ALD.

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PMID:
8514042
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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