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Dentomaxillofac Radiol. 1993 Feb;22(1):28-32.

Comparison of panoramic and intraoral radiography for the diagnosis of caries and periapical pathology.

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  • 1Department of Oral Radiology, University of Göteborg, Göthenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

Panoramic and intraoral radiographs from 400 consecutive patients were compared for their ability to demonstrate periapical pathology and caries. Two hundred panoramic radiographs were exposed with the rotational technique and 200 with the intraoral X-ray tube technique. Periapical osteolytic and sclerotic lesions as well as approximal caries were recorded independently by two observes. Agreement with intraoral radiographs for periapical osteolytic lesions was, on average, 63% for the rotational and 55% for the intraoral X-ray tube technique and for sclerotic lesions 40% and 36%, respectively. The agreement varied with tooth type and lesion size. When teeth without periapical lesions were also included in the comparisons, the values for agreement were over 96%. Interobserver agreement for periapical osteolytic lesions was 61% for the rotational and 56% for the intraoral X-ray tube technique. The corresponding values for sclerotic lesions were 29% and 23%. Intraobserver agreement for periapical osteolytic lesions was 71% for the rotational and 67% for the intraoral X-ray tube technique. The corresponding values for sclerotic lesions were 46% and 56%. Agreement with intraoral radiographs for enamel caries was, on average, 21% for the rotational and 27% for the intraoral X-ray tube technique and for dentinal lesions 44% and 53%, respectively. When caries-free approximal surfaces were also included in the comparisons, the values for agreement were over 95%. It is concluded that panoramic and intraoral radiography perform equally well as diagnostic tools for the detection of periapical lesions, although the results are not identical.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
8508938
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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